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My Garden Diary, – Reminders for July 1914

my garden diary

 

While war was just around the corner, the tasks for July 1914 continued in the garden….

One pressing duty of the month is the planting out at every opportunity of Broccoli, Cabbage, and Winter Greens. Brassicas endure so much rough usage that the work is sometimes carelessly done. When lifted gently with all their fibres intact, and the roots are firmed or puddled into the soil with care, it makes an immense difference in the result.

The summer or so-called autumn sowing of Cabbage, for securing delicate hearts in spring, is so important a matter as to deserve reconsideration. Crops are often partially or wholly lost through the bolting of the plants after winter has passed. As a rule the disappointment is attributable to the choice of unsuitable varieties, or to premature sowing. Careful experiments have demonstrated that for the southern counties August is preferable to July for getting in Cabbage seed. Where the plants are not liable to bolt, seed will continue to be sown in July.

Sow Endive for October use; Best of All Tomato for a late autumn crop, and at the end of month a sowing of Winter Beauty to fruit in winter; Parsley for the winter; Sutton’s Long-standing Prickly Spinach for late autumn or winter cutting; and Black Spanish Radish for salads. Sow Turnip, including the yellow varieties; early types of Carrots; and Globe Beet.1914 Catalogue Endive Page

Plant out more Celery, and Leeks in trenches prepared as for Celery. Mulch and if necessary give water to late crops of Peas and Beans. Thin Cardoons, leaving the strongest plants. Pot Strawberry runners for forcing. Stop useless growth in Vegetable Marrows and Tomatoes.

Ply the hoe incessantly, and bury all rubbish in a trench to benefit the garden, instead of allowing it to become a nuisance.

It is still possible to raise Herbaceous Calceolarias from seed sown in shallow pans kept moist in a cold frame near the glass. Sutton’s Primulas from earlier sowings will now require a shift, and they thrive best under nearly hardy treatment. Give them good soil, avoid forcing, and allow the plants to develop slowly.

Pot Campanulas for blooming next summer in the conservatory. Carnations to be layered. Lift intermediate Stocks for potting, and pot Arum Lilies.

Biennials and Perennials, including Brompton and Queen Stocks, may be sown as advised under June, and a second sowing of many varieties is desirable to ensure a succession, Antirrhinums sown now in drills may be transferred direct from the seed-bed to where they are intended to bloom.

MONTHLY NOTES

1    Special Sessions for Licences to deal in Game held this month.
3    Dog days begin.
6    Marriage of the King, 1893.
7    Old Midsummer Day. Full Moon, 2.0 p.m.
9    Midsummer Fire Insurances must be paid.
15    St. Swithin. Moon – Last Quarter, 7.32 a.m.
20    Last day for county electors to send in their claims; also for payment of rates and taxes due January 5.
23    New Moon, 2.38 a.m.
29    Moon – First Quarter, 11.51 p.m.
31    Games Licences expire. Licence to carry guns expires.

Barometer, 29.801 in.            Temperature, 62.8 deg. Fahr.
Rainfall, 2.35 in.            Rainfall for July 1914 ……………..

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Lis

About Lis

Our Suttons Blog comes from Lis Wallace, Head of Customer Service here at Suttons since 2002. Living on the edge of Dartmoor Lis has a large and “somewhat tricky” garden split across several levels but with the bonus of a stream tumbling through and a large, fertile veg patch.

Across the blog Lis will share some of the knowledge she has gained over the years from her father, from working at Suttons and also from her own trial and error. Storm the Jack Russell is bound to chip in now and then. That’s what terriers do!

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