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Lofos Plants Growing Guide

Lofos Plants - Burgundy Falls [226051]

The latin name for Lofos is Lophospermum erubescens but may be found listed as Asarina erubescens or Maurandya erubescens in some gardening books. It originates from mountainous areas of Mexico where it grows at an altitude of around 2,000 metres.Lophospermum is a tender perennial plant suitable for growing in hanging baskets or against a wall or trellis where it will reach a height of up to 3m (10′).

Care of the plants

Initially your Lofos plants should be potted into 7.5-9cm (3-3½”) pots using a good quality, freely draining potting compost. If the plants are to be planted in the border use a 10cm (4″) pot. Grow on in a greenhouse, conservatory or indoors at a minimum temperature of 15ºC (60ºF). In the early stages keep the plants on the dry side and ventilate the greenhouse whenever weather conditions allow as the young plants can be susceptible to the fungal disease Botrytis.

Pinch out the growing tip to produce a bushy habit when the plants have reached a height of about 10cm (4″). Transfer your Lofos plants to hanging baskets when a good root system has been established, three plants will be sufficient for a 35cm (14″) diameter basket. Once the plants are growing vigorously keep the compost moist and apply a balanced liquid feed at 10 day intervals.

The plants can be placed outdoors in partial shade or full sun during late May or early June after the danger of frost has passed. When grown in the border against a support, space the plants 60cm (24″) apart in a well drained soil.
Mature plants can be over-wintered in a greenhouse at a minimum temperature of 5ºC (41ºF).

At these lower temperatures the Lofos plants may lose their leaves. Water sparingly during the winter months until growth recommences in spring.

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2 thoughts on “Lofos Plants Growing Guide”

  1. Hi Linda, a clearance of 3″ from the eave is not enough and the plant is not thriving because it needs more room and light at the top. Even though it will trail down it still needs light and space from above to grow well. I would suggest a minimum of 15 to 20″ of space to the eave. This will also allow you to monitor the moisture levels of the compost and easier to see when the plant needs watering.

    Thanks,
    Suttons Gardening Grow How Team.

  2. Linda L. Charbonneau says:

    I was reading your article on the red lofos. My friend and I bought our plants at the same time, but mine doesn’t look good at all now, while hers has a lot of plush green leaves and many flowers. Mine has few leaves, and right now only has about 3 flowers on it…looking pretty scraggly. It gets full to part sun, and I don’t over water. I have it hanging about 3 inches under an eave. Just don’t know what or if I’m doing something wrong. She has hers hangin on the edge of a porch and gets sun from about 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Would you have any advice?

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