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Citrus Trees Growing Guide

Citrus tree

Citrus trees are surprisingly hardy, tolerating temperatures down to -5°C and will thrive in most gardens given a warm sunny position. In the UK they are probably best grown in a large pot or other suitable container as this will allow them to be moved as conditions dictate. Citrus Trees will not however tolerate wet conditions and water-logging for any length of time will usually result in the loss of a plant. For this reason they should be grown in very free draining soil or compost.

A layer of stones or crocks in the bottom of the pot will aid drainage as will the addition of approx 20% sand to the compost. Ideally the compost should also be slightly on the acid side of neutral. The tree should be watered sparingly, using rain water if possible. Feed occasionally when temperatures exceed 10°C using either specialist citrus plant fertiliser if available or alternatively any general soluble feed that has good levels of nitrogen and phosphate.

Tip: Use a paint brush daily to pollinate the lemon tree flowers once they are open. 

Highly fragrant blossom will appear quite early in the year and will be followed by the fruits which will be ready to pick between November and February. If severe weather is a risk potted plants can be moved into a warm, frost-free greenhouse or conservatory but should not be moved to deep shade as this may result in leaf drop. Such plants should only be watered sparingly when the compost dries.

Pruning can be restricted to removal of especially unsightly or broken branches and a light trim occasionally to maintain shape. to view more and buy Citrus Trees visit Suttons

Citrus tree Moved into a conservatory

Orange Trees Tips

Orange trees prefer to live outside from spring to just before the first frosts, moving them into an unheated glasshouse for the winter. If they begin to drop leaves, this can be a sign of stress. There is either too much heat, cold or wet. Any fruit should be removed from young plants in the late autumn so it can concentrate on growth. They should be pruned in the spring and trimmed in autumn to shape, they are normally vigorous and can be pruned quite heavily.

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4 thoughts on “Citrus Trees Growing Guide”

  1. Katie Brunt Katie Brunt says:

    Hi Philip, we feel the orange trees would prefer to live outside from spring to just before the first frosts, moving them into an unheated glasshouse for the winter. Dropping leaves can be a sign of stress, either too much heat, cold or wet. Any fruit should be removed from young plants in the late autumn so it can concentrate on growth. They should be pruned in the spring and trimmed in autumn to shape, they are normally vigorous and can be pruned quite heavily. We hope this has been helpful to you.
    Best regards,
    The Suttons Team

  2. Katie Brunt Katie Brunt says:

    Good morning Graham, yes you are absolutely right. Use a paint brush daily to pollinate the lemon tree flowers once they are open. We hope this has been helpful to you.
    Best regards,
    The Suttons Team

  3. Avatar Graham Smith says:

    Good morning,
    Can you advise me, my small lemon tree has flower buds forming, will I have to use a small paint brush to pollinate the flowers when open. the plant is in a warm room. [ temperature not going lower than 10 degrees ]. alongside I have a lime and orange trees, no sign of flowers yet, the plants are only 9inches high, bought last year.

  4. Avatar Philip casburn says:

    hi there, I bought 2 orange trees last napping off you guys and a few more since. The 2 I bought first starting leafing fine and flowers etc. The first one started to ooze from its bark like a sap and dropped its leaves and completely died. The second one, has 3 oranges on it the size of tennis balls and now it is starting to shed some leaves and now I have noticed the stem oozing and I think it will die like the other. Do you have any idea what is going on. ? They are planted inside a glass house in a multipurpose compost which is moist but not soaking anytime. Any info or help would help. Also I noticed a distortion in a couple of leaves.

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