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Autumn Colour

If summer colours are lilacs, pinks and blues then autumn colours are reds, golds, bronze and purples. The colours of autumn are rich and warm whilst in contrast the air is cooling and the mists are rising.

According to garden folklore, autumn begins when the last foxglove flower fades. To schoolchildren it is the start of the new school year and to astronomers autumn arrives with the autumnal equinox on 21st September.

So, as the annuals and tender perennials fade away what plants will go on to bring colour to our gardens:

Trees & Shrubs

Acers must be the kings of autumn. In a range of colours and sizes they are a must for a sheltered spot in the garden. Other trees and shrubs that give late interest include:

Cotoneaster – comes in all shapes and sizes but most have one thing in common – glorious autumn foliage

Skimmia – evergreen leaves and red berries

Sumac – large palm-like leaves turn orange, red and purple

Pyracantha – perfect for thorny hedging the berries vary from yellow through orange and red

Fothergilla – an unspectacular plant for most of the year but wonderful in autumn when the leaves turn golden yellow and red.

Cornus – most varieties are grown for their eye-catching stems

Border Perennials

Aster – often called Michaelmas Daisies, these bloom in September and October

Bergenia – the large green leaves turn red from September onwards

Kochia – known as the Burning Bush this annual turns a flaming red.

Echinacea – an easy to grow, late flowering perennial

Helenium – a real “hot bed” favourite and an indispensable source of rich colour

Chinese Lanterns – a real novelty, popular for flower arrangements

Rudbeckia – a late flowering perennial, perfect for planting with Echinacea

Sedum – interesting fleshy leaves and heads of colour that provide welcome late food to butterflies and bees

 

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Lis

About Lis

Our Suttons Blog comes from Lis Wallace, Head of Customer Service here at Suttons since 2002. Living on the edge of Dartmoor Lis has a large and “somewhat tricky” garden split across several levels but with the bonus of a stream tumbling through and a large, fertile veg patch. Across the blog Lis will share some of the knowledge she has gained over the years from her father, from working at Suttons and also from her own trial and error. Storm the Jack Russell is bound to chip in now and then. That’s what terriers do!

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